Qompendium is an evolving and ever-changing platform for philosophy, art, culture and science, represented by a series of print publications: magazines, books and monographs. Furthermore, it is enriched by a gallery concept, a work shop and a fast-moving online portal.


Qompendium Trivial


we talked about it already.

S. T. Eliot

 

We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.

Science

It is through mathematics that we can hold not one but an infinity of infinities in the palm of our hand, for all of eternity.

 

Ashutosh Jogalekar is a chemist interested in the history and philosophy of science. He considers science to be a seamless and all-encompassing part of the human experience.

Science

John Bannister Goodenough

 

John Bannister Goodenough (born of U. S. parents in Jena, Germany, 25 July 1922) is an American professor and prominent solid-state physicist. He is currently a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the University of Texas at Austin. He is widely credited for the identification and development of the Li-ion rechargeable battery as well as for developing the Goodenough-Kanamori rules for determining the sign of the magnetic superexchange in materials.

Science

The man who imagined the Internet in 1895

 

Everything in the universe, and everything of man, would be registered at a distance as it was produced. In this way a moving image of the world will be established, a true mirror of his memory. From a distance, everyone will be able to read text, enlarged and limited to the desired subject, projected on an individual screen. In this way, everyone from his armchair will be able to contemplate creation in its entirety or in certain of its parts.

Paul Otlet

Science

N55

 

N55 has its own means of production and distribution.
Manuals for N55 things are published at www.N55.dk and in the N55 periodical. Furthermore, N55 things are implemented in various situations around the world, initiated by N55 or in collaboration with different persons and institutions.

All N55 works are Open Source provided under the rules of Creative Commons as specified here.

For further reading.

Science

N55
Posted
Monday, 17.03.2014

Based in Copenhagen, N55 is an art collective that uses art as their platform to explore reforms in social design through engineering. The "No Borders" campaign, one of their many initiatives, aims to eliminate all borders around the world and to declare the earth a currently threatened resource that is the the common inheritance of all people.

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flat, universe, nasa

Science

Posted
Saturday, 28.12.2013

The Universe is flat...maybe, is the more widely held theory among physical cosmologists based on recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) measurements. "We now know that the universe is flat with only a 0.4% margin of error", say NASA scientists.

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Science

Botulism

 

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and sometimes by strains of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii. There are five main kinds of botulism. Foodborne botulism is caused by eating foods that contain the botulinum toxin. Wound botulism is caused by toxin produced from a wound infected with Clostridium botulinum. Infant botulism is caused by consuming the spores of the botulinum bacteria, which then grow in the intestines and release toxin. Adult intestinal toxemia (adult intestinal colonization) botulism is a very rare kind of botulism that occurs among adults by the same route as infant botulism. Lastly, iatrogenic botulism can occur from accidental overdose of botulinum toxin. All forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies. Foodborne botulism is a public health emergency because many people can be poisoned by eating a contaminated food.

Find out more here.
More information here.

Video

Lunette: The Cup

Maybe a tabu theme or maybe categorized as boring? Maybe it is only for women? If we can go to cloth diapers for babies we can also rethink menstrual cycles and tampons.

In average a woman uses up to 17.000 pads or tampons during her lifetime. The resulting waste amounts to a global annual of 45 billion feminine hygiene products and it creates not only an ecological but also a health problem: bacteria, imbalance of vaginal flora and bad odor to name a few.

The first reaction to the word „menstrual cup“ is usually something between disbelief and repulse. But it shouldn't be. This little invention dates back to the 1930s. Now it makes a big come back by the Finns. Lunette is biodegradable, healthy and sin free.

More information on www.lunette.com

Science

Johann Maria Farina gegenüber dem Jülischsplatz

 

Napoleon Bonaparte was a loyal perfume enthusiast. It was reported he used eight quarts of Eau de Cologne for rubdowns every month. This is how Kölnisch Wasser came in to being.

Read further.

Olympus Bioscapes

Science

Olympus Bioscapes
Posted
Wednesday, 08.08.2012

The Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition is an international photo competition that honors the world's most extraordinary microscope images of life science subjects. Captured through light microscopes, entrants can use any magnification, any illumination technique and any brand of equipment. Techniques are varied as differential interface contrast, confocal, multiphoton, epifluorescence, brightfield, darkfield and stereomicroscopy. Take one of last year’s winners for instance with an incredible microscopic image of fruit fly ovaries and uterus that look like ripe strawberries hanging from a vine due to background staining, which has coloured them red. 


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Science

Research Methods of Fragrance on People

 

Olfactory research methods: There are many new and developing methods for researching the effects of fragrance on people, both physiological and psychological. Take your pick from brain electrical activity and systolic blood pressure measurements to heart rate monitoring, cortisol level and electro-dermal readings.

Read more here

Science

A Natural History of the Senses

 

As to why floral smells should excite us, well, flowers have a robust and energetic sex life: A flower’s fragrance declares to all the world that it is fertile, available, and desirable, its sex organs oozing with nectar. Its smell reminds us in vestigial ways of fertility, vigor, lifeforce, all the optimism, expectancy, and passionate bloom of youth. We inhale its ardent aroma and, no matter what our ages, we feel young and nubile in  world aflame with desire.

Read further.

Perfume and a Man’s Sex Life?

 

A sample study performed by Germany's DMAX television station reveals that the number of perfume flacons allows us to draw certain conclusions about a man’s sex life. To put it simply, the more fragrances found in the bathroom, the more frequently their male owner has sex. On average, a man will have between two and six different fragrances, but one in ten men possesses seven or more.

Read further.

Large Hadron Collider, Higgs Boson, Cern

Science

LHC – Cern
Posted
Friday, 20.04.2012

Scientists have increased the power levels at which they smash together fundamental particles, sending them speeding toward each other at energies of 4 teraelectron volts (TeV), creating a collision energy of 8 TeV—a new world record. Ultimately, the collider will run at 7TeV each, producing a collision energy of 14 TeV. The power-up will require the machine to shutdown for refurbishment at the end of the year. 


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Science

Silent Night Stealth Attack Fighter

 

The Silent Night stealth attack fighter was the baseline configuration included in a feasibility study North American Aviation had with the Office of Naval Research between 1971 and 1973.  This was during the later stages of the Vietnam War, when losses over North Vietnam to Soviet metric radars were disturbing.  The Navy wanted options to defeat these radars, then destroy them.  The Silent Night was the result of this study.

Science

Silent Night Stealth Attack Fighter
Posted
Friday, 20.04.2012

The Silent Night stealth attack fighter was the baseline configuration included in a feasibility study North American Aviation had with the Office of Naval Research between 1971 and 1973.  This was during the later stages of the Vietnam War, when losses over North Vietnam to Soviet metric radars were disturbing.  The Navy wanted options to defeat these radars, then destroy them.  The Silent Night was the result of this study.

Science

Choosing the Ink

 

When choosing fountain pen inks always choose water soluble dyes which allow for a continuous flow. Pigment-based ink and India inks contain suspended particles which can clog pen capillaries. The same goes for any calligraphy inks.

If you’re looking to leave an indelible mark, iron-gall inks - used by the likes of Leonardo da Vinci, Johann Sebastian Bach and Hans Christian Anderson - will do the trick.  In earlier times due to iron content, this substance was known to corrode paper the same way metal oxidizes when experiencing varying climate changes. These days using neutral pH dyes eliminates the problem. 

chalk plates, French, medicine

Science

Dr. Auzoux’s Art
Posted
Thursday, 01.03.2012

Created by French physician Dr. Louis Auzoux, these rare, collectible plates were used as teaching tools in France from 1900 through the 1960s. Made of chalk paper, the intricate works of art were used by teachers to illustrate the topic of the day.

A true embodiment of medical visualizations graduated to art, Auzoux was also well known for his meticulous papier-mâché anatomical models executed with breathtaking detail. 


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Botanical Wall Charts

 

A cross pollination between education, art and science, the Hagemann botanical wall charts from Jung Koch Quentell are appreciated the world over for their didactic value.

Find out on the entire series here.

cp snow

Science

C.P. Snow's The Two Cultures
Posted
Thursday, 01.03.2012

A chasm between the humanities and sciences? Snow makes the case for the unification of the seemingly polar opposites by way of a third culture.

“For constantly I felt I was moving among two groups – comparable in intelligence, identical in race, not grossly different in social origin, earning about the same incomes, who had almost ceased to communicate at all, who in intellectual, moral and psychological climate had so little in common that one might have crossed an ocean.”

“There are few parts of the hard sciences which one can understand so much without mathematical training. What one needs most of all is visual and three-dimensional imagination, and it is a study where painters and sculptors could be instantaneously at home.”

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Science

From the Rob Lavinsky Collection
Posted
Sunday, 05.02.2012

Sapat Gali (Soppat; Suppat; Sumpat), Manshera, Naran-Kagan Valley, Kohistan District, North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan small cabinet, 6.1 x 3.7 x 3.5 cm

Robert Matthew "Rob" Lavinsky, proprietor of The Arkenstone mineral dealership, was born December 13, 1972 in Columbus, Ohio, the son of Richard Lavinsky, an attorney, and Marilyn Rosen, a dental hygienist. He began collecting calcite at age 13, with the support of many mentors in the Columbus Rock and Mineral Society, including Carlton Davis , field collectors John Medici and Henry Fisher, and dealers Neal and Chris Pfaff, among others. He competed with his calcites (which he still owns) for the first time at age 18 in the Berea, Ohio show. He eventually expanded his scope to collecting United Kingdom classics, Sweet Home mine rhodochrosite, and worldwide classics. As a field-collector he dug for minerals in the dolostone quarries and roadcuts throughout Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky (Halls Gap millerite), Ontario (Bancroft), and various other localities.

Science

A Pocket Knife or Jackknife

 

A pocket knife is a folding knife with one or more blades that fit inside the handle that can still fit in a pocket. It is also known as a jackknife or jack-knife. Blades can range from 1 cm (1/2 inch) to as much as 30 cm (12 inches) in length, but a more typical blade length is 5 to 15 cm (2 to 6 inches.)

Pocket knives are versatile tools, and may be used for anything from opening an envelope, to cutting twine, to slicing an apple or even for self-defense.

Science

The Steelmaking Process or the Art of it?

 

Goro Nyudo Masamune was one the great swordsmiths of the golden age or the Kamakura period (1185 – 1333) as it was called in Japan. He developed a sword making technique that involved folding the steel 15 times – that is 215 or more than 30.000 layers which were actually thinner than tissue paper.

Read full article here.

Science

What is the Rockwell Scale?

 

A scale which gauges the hardness of a material based on the measure of its indentation. The determination of the Rockwell hardness of a material involves the application of a minor load followed by a major load, and then noting the depth of penetration, in which a harder material gives a higher number.

Find out more.

Science

What is the Rockwell Scale?
Posted
Monday, 28.11.2011

A scale which gauges the hardness of a material based on the measure of its indentation. The determination of the Rockwell hardness of a material involves the application of a minor load followed by a major load, and then noting the depth of penetration, in which a harder material gives a higher number.

One of the reasons for the lightness and elegance of the Swiss Army Knife is due to the multi-function use of each spring – usually six blades to every two springs. Blades usually have a Rockwell C of 56. Saws, scissors and files have a hardness of RC 53, tin openers and reamers have RC 52 and corkscrews and springs have RC 49.

 

The Tameshigiri procedure

To determine the quality of swords, Japanese blades were tested on the cadavers of criminals in a detailed procedure (tameshigiri) involving sixteen cut variations of alternating difficulty until the examiner was satisfied. One of the most elaborate cuts involved one sweeping cut from the hip to the opposite shoulder.

Swiss Army Knife

 

Multi-tool knives formerly consisted of variations on the American camper style or the Swiss Army knives manufactured by Victorinox, Wenger, and others. However, the concept of a multitool knife has undergone a revolution thanks in part to an avalanche of new styles, sizes, and tool presentation concepts. These new varieties often incorporate a pair of pliers and other tools in conjunction with one or more knife blade styles, either locking or non-locking. And now take a look at the Victorinox Tomo.

Sough

 

Is the sound a sword makes as it cuts through the air.

Science

Legal or not?

 

Pocket knives are legal to own in most countries, but may face legal restrictions on their use. While pocket knives are almost always designed as tools, they do have the potential to be considered by legal authorities as weapons.

Video

How to Pronounce Ayn Rand

From Ayn Rand to Qatar and Hermés this channel has it all. One of our all time favorites.

Video

How to Pronounce Paradigm

The word paradigm has been used in science to describe distinct concepts. It comes from Greek "παράδειγμα" (paradeigma), "pattern, example, sample"from the verb "παραδείκνυμι" (paradeiknumi), "exhibit, represent, expose"and that from "παρά" (para), "beside, beyond" + "δείκνυμι" (deiknumi), "to show, to point out".

Video

Anatomy of a Computer Virus

An infographic dissecting the nature and ramifications of Stuxnet, the first weapon made entirely out of code. This was produced for Australian TV program HungryBeast on Australia's ABC1

Direction and Motion Graphics: Patrick Clair, www.patrickclair.com
Written by: Scott Mitchell
Production Company: Zapruder's Other Films.

Science

Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in.

 

Why Light needs Darkness

 

Lighting architect Rogier van der Heide offers a beautiful new way to look at the world – by paying attention to light (and to darkness). Examples from classic buildings illustrate a deeply thought-out vision of the play of light around us.

Watch it on Ted.

Science

Why Light needs Darkness
Posted
Wednesday, 23.03.2011

Lighting designer Rogier van der Heide creates (and oversees) engaging, inspiring, three-dimensional design that fuses light, image projection, architecture and product design to create a memorable, authentic experience. He's been internationally recognized as one of the leading architectural lighting design specialists. He's the Chief Design Officer for Philips Lighting; before that, he was Director at Arup and Global Business Leader Lighting Design of Arup Lighting.

Van der Heide is one of five international designers commissioned by Swarovski Crystal Palace to create an installation to be launched during the Milan Furniture Fair this year.

Science

Beautiful Minds: Imaging Cells of the Nervous System
Posted
Sunday, 13.03.2011

In the March issue of Scientific American Carl Schoonover, author of Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century, describes a new computer-modeling technique that allows researchers to zoom in on the smallest components of the active brain in 3-D. To accompany the story, we've collected images from his recent book, which describes the tools that scientists have used to observe the nervous system from the second century to the present. During the past 20 years, breakthroughs in these technologies have fueled unprecedented advances in neuroscience.

More here.


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Science

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Future

 

It is 1964 and Arthur C. Clarke predicts a future that might have been far-fetched back then but not anymore.

Watch clip on Youtube.

Science

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Future
Posted
Sunday, 16.01.2011

It is 1964 and Arthur C. Clarke predicts a future that might have been far-fetched back then but not anymore.

Watch clip on Youtube.

computers, ataris, histo

Science

Pong: The Machine is Broken!
Posted
Wednesday, 05.01.2011

That terse message summoned Al Alcorn to Andy Capp's bar in Sunnyvale two weeks after Alcorn had installed the Pong arcade game. Pong's problem? Popularity. Its milk carton coin-catcher was jammed with quarters.

Pong heralded a gaming revolution. Mechanical arcade games like pinball had appeared the late 1800s. Pong, designed by Alcorn for Atari in 1972, launched the video game craze that transformed and reinvigorated the old arcades and made Atari the first successful video game company.


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Science

Today’s 1TB drive would have cost trillion in the 1950s

 

"A 1TB hard drive that sells for as little as today would have been worth trillion in the 1950s, when computer storage cost per byte, according to Dag Spicer, senior curator of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. And a modern-day 4GB stick of RAM would have cost billion."

Read full article here.

Science

The Hardware Race
Posted
Wednesday, 05.01.2011

"A 1TB hard drive that sells for as little as today would have been worth trillion in the 1950s, when computer storage cost per byte, according to Dag Spicer, senior curator of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. And a modern-day 4GB stick of RAM would have cost billion."

Read full article here.
Check the Computer History Channel on YouTube

The_evolution_of_hard_disk_drives

Science

Vision: A Tribute to Carl Sagan

 

It has been ten years since Carl Sagan passed away; it's been twenty six years since 'Cosmos' was first broadcast. Today, a handful of Hubble Space Telescope images are starting to equal some of the most amazing views provided by Dr. Sagan's "Spaceship of the Imagination".

Science

Vision: A Tribute to Carl Sagan
Posted
Wednesday, 22.12.2010

It has been ten years since Carl Sagan passed away; it's been twenty six years since 'Cosmos' was first broadcast. Today, a handful of Hubble Space Telescope images are starting to equal some of the most amazing views provided by Dr. Sagan's "Spaceship of the Imagination". This video examines one of those views, looking at a photo released by NASA in January of 2006... This video is a message of remembrance, as well as a tribute to all who work to ensure our view of the Cosmos continues to improve with each generation.

 

Watch movie here.





 
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